The board of trustees unanimously passed a resolution denouncing the proposed changes. Trustees for Carroll Independent School District passed a resolution denouncing President Joe Biden’s rewrite of Title IX. During Monday night’s meeting, the Carroll ISD board of trustees unanimously passed the resolution in a 6-0 vote. “The CISD Board of Trustees denounces the recent changes to Title IX regulations proposed by the Biden administration, expressing deep concern over the potential negative impact on our students and community,” reads the resolution. view article arw

The board of trustees unanimously passed a resolution denouncing the proposed changes. Trustees for Carroll Independent School District passed a resolution denouncing President Joe Biden’s rewrite of Title IX. During Monday night’s meeting, the Carroll ISD board of trustees unanimously passed the resolution in a 6-0 vote. “The CISD Board of Trustees denounces the recent changes to Title IX regulations proposed by the Biden administration, expressing deep concern over the potential negative impact on our students and community,” reads the resolution. view article arw

Despite Gov. Greg Abbott saying Texas would ignore changes to Title IX that would threaten female students and athletes, Texas A&M University is reportedly “scrambling” to comply. view article arw

The Republican Party of Texas will soon be exploring ways to close their primary elections in an effort to stop Democrats from interfering in picking the party’s nominees. Texas GOP Chairman Matt Rinaldi announced the creation of a new working group ahead of the party’s convention next month to explore both “legislative and extra-legislative avenues” for the party to close the primary elections, as the legislature has repeatedly failed to do so. While establishing closed primaries—in which voters may only vote in the primary elections for the party they are affiliated with—has been a legislative priority of the Republican Party of Texas, the state instead operates an open primary system. Voters of any party can choose which party’s primary they would like to vote in, although they may not vote in both in the same year. In some districts, that means Democrats voting in Republican primary elections in safely red districts to elect more moderate candidates. Nearly 73 percent of Republican voters approved a ballot proposition in support of closed primaries during the primary election last month. view article arw

The new version would add “gender identity” as a protected class, which State Rep. Brian Harrison says will put Texas students in imminent danger.  With the Biden administration announcing plans to radically change the federal Title IX program to give protections to biological men in women’s spaces, Republican State Rep. Brian Harrison of Midlothian is calling on House Speaker Dade Phelan to conduct interim hearings on removing federal funds from Texas’ schools. On Friday, the Biden administration rolled out a nearly 1,500-page rewrite of Title IX rules—the federal civil rights law originally designed to prohibit sex-based discrimination in education.  The new version would add “gender identity” as a protected class, which Harrison says will create a “public education emergency” and put Texas students in “imminent danger”: view article arw

The U.S. Supreme Court denied Democrats’ request to hear arguments against the state’s age limit for using mail-in ballots. Texas Democrats lost another attempt to overturn the state’s election law that limits no-excuse mail-in voting to voters who are 65 years of age or older. On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court denied Democrats’ request to hear arguments intended to force Texas and other states to accept universal voting by mail. Lower courts have rejected their claims multiple times. Under Texas law, only voters 65 or older, disabled, in jail, or outside their home county during an election are eligible to vote by mail. The Texas Democrat Party filed a lawsuit in early 2020 seeking to make voting by mail universal, using fears about the COVID-19 outbreak as an excuse to push their preferred policies. view article arw

Knowing your ABCs is essential to academic success, but having a last name starting with A, B or C might also help make the grade. An analysis by University of Michigan researchers of more than 30 million grading records from U-M finds students with alphabetically lower-ranked names receive lower grades. This is due to sequential grading biases and the default order of students' submissions in Canvas—the most widely used online learning management system—which is based on the alphabetical rank of their surnames. view article arw

After his Massachusetts school district tried to remove important services from his special needs son, Scott Pitta tried to record a meeting with administrators, but in doing so, he claims they shut down the meeting. Now, he is suing on the basis that school officials violated his constitutional rights.  view article arw

Ricci Shepherd loves working as an engagement officer for a charity, but it is very different to her previous career as a primary school teacher. She is among a growing number of teachers opting for a complete career change. "The stress involved with teaching and the amount of work, and at the time I was a mum with younger children, I found that really challenging," Ms Shepherd said. "I no longer have my registration. view article arw

A Rhode Island student smashed a ketchup packet with his fist, splattering an administrator. Another ripped up his school work. The district called it “destruction of school property.” A Washington student turned cartwheels while a PE teacher attempted to give instructions. view article arw

Election years are supposed to be the time for democracy to shine. We’ll debate, we’ll campaign and then in November we’ll come together to decide which direction we'll swim for the next two to four years. But in Texas, who’ll run the state is usually decided in the spring. And it’s a much smaller share of people who participate in those elections. We the Texans A yearlong Texas Tribune project on democracy. Read more. That’s especially true in legislative and congressional races, thanks to gerrymandering and noncompetitive elections. Let’s take a look at the 2022 race in state House District 142 in Houston as an example of why. That year, some local Democrats were angry at HD 142’s incumbent, view article arw

Late March 26, a federal appeals court further blocked a Texas law that would allow police officers to arrest people suspected of being in the country illegally. In a 2-1 ruling issued minutes before midnight, a panel of judges from the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals denied Texas’ request to allow the law, known as Senate Bill 4, to take effect as a legal battle continues. The court is scheduled to hear arguments April 3 on the legality of SB 4. One week earlier, the U.S. Supreme Court briefly allowed SB 4 to take effect March 19 before it was halted by the appeals court. view article arw

School districts around the country are facing issues with how they handle their social media accounts, and the debate has reached the U.S. Supreme Court. Denver Public Schools recently reviewed its social media policy that doesn’t allow employees to restrict comments on social media or limit who can see them. view article arw

There is a growing and disturbing trend of anti-intellectual elitism in American culture. It's the dismissal of science, the arts, and humanities and their replacement by entertainment, self-righteousness, ignorance, and deliberate gullibility. Susan Jacoby, author of The Age of American Unreason, says in an article in the Washington Post, "Dumbness, to paraphrase the late senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, has been steadily defined downward for several decades, by a combination of heretofore irresistible forces. These include the triumph of video culture over print culture; a disjunction between Americans' rising level of formal education and their shaky grasp of basic geography, science and history; and the fusion of anti-rationalism with anti-intellectualism."  view article arw

A Mississippi school district has been ordered to desegregate its schools after what the Justice Department called a five-decade-long legal battle. The Cleveland School District, about two hours northwest of Jackson, was told that it must consolidate its schools in order to provide real desegregation for students in the city of about 12,000. view article arw