Claycomb Associates, Architects

The Greenville ISD administration and school board are considering updating the district's policy regarding student access to books, graphic novels and other media in their campus' libraries—especially those that might be deemed inappropriate by some parents. The proposed adjustments to Greenville ISD's policy also attempt to better define how parental consent will figure into the process. The changes under consideration come two months after the Texas Education Agency (TEA) released a “model policy” to districts that the agency recommended for adoption. In TEA's model policy, it states: “While instructional materials and library materials are both considered instructional resources, they are not the same. … TEA’s model policy provides such a distinction by solely addressing the review, selection, and approval of library materials, including procedures to ensure transparency and clear processes for parents to challenge those chosen materials in a more comprehensive manner.” view article arw

Donna ISD could soon find itself free from Texas Education Agency oversight as soon as December. TEA conservator Linda Romeros told the district’s board earlier this month that she and Superintendent Angela Dominguez met with the agency on June 13 and discussed necessary steps to eliminate her role at the district. Romeros came to the district in 2017 as a monitor after a special accreditation investigation conducted by TEA found a lack of internal controls related to trustees’ compliance with sta view article arw

Summer school may not always be fun, but Tyler ISD tries to help some of its students learn by bringing the outside world into the classroom.  TYLER, Texas — Summer school may not always be fun, but Tyler ISD tries to make learning exciting for its students by bringing the outside world into the classroom.   This isn’t the normal reaction you would get from kids in summer school, but at Griffin Elementary, the students were excited about a special guest. view article arw

Seven-year-old Lillyana Lortz reached slowly for her next Lego piece as she processed what she had learned to identify word parts and syllables. Crafts and games were just a couple of ways that Copperas Cove ISD teachers improved students’ reading and writing skills through the district’s inaugural multisensory camp for students with dyslexia. “It made reading fun,” the House Creek Elementary second grader said. Dyslexia is a language-based learning disability that may hinder reading, writing, spelling and sometimes speaking. Children and adults with dyslexia have a neurological disorder that causes their brains to process and interpret information differently. view article arw

ECTOR COUNTY, Texas (KMID/KPEJ)- Students and school districts across Texas are getting a look at spring STAAR and End of Course Exam scores. The statewide standardized test measured student progress after two years of coronavirus disruption and after seeing local test scores at Tuesday night’s board meeting, Ector County ISD Trustees said the district saw “strong” scores in many areas. Scores in each grade level are measured in three ways: Approaches, Meets and Masters. The scores indicate that students are either approaching grade level expectations, meet grade level expectations, or have mastered the content learned in their grade level. view article arw

RANKIN, Texas — Rankin ISD announced on its Facebook page that its new elementary school will have a special feature. The "Slide to Success" has been installed in the Gossett Elementary building. view article arw

CANYON, Texas (KAMR/KCIT) – According to officials with Canyon Independent School District on Thursday, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) adjusted the release date of STAAR test scores from what was previously Friday, June 24. The May STAAR test scores for the third through eighth grades were initially planned to be released Friday in the family and analytic portal said the district. However, due to impacts from COVID-19, the TEA said it “is running additional analyses on the data as part of an enhanced due diligence process.” view article arw

Belton ISD is providing summer classes to elementary students for the fifth year. They provide engaging ways to learn and an alternative to summer camp.  BELTON, Texas — Summer classes have gotten a new look at Belton ISD. Elementary school students are taking courses that range from engineering to theater.  Administrators say these classes bridge the summer learning gap by preparing students for the upcoming year, but in a creative way.  Courtney Brewer, the principal for the summer classes, says there are studies that show creative and engaging projects in the classroom are more productive for children. view article arw

JEFFERSON — Jefferson ISD is currently accepting enrollment for its new tuition-based pre-kindergarten program that will begin this upcoming 2022-23 school year. Jefferson Primary School is now enrolling students in the program, which will allow the students to earn an early childhood education from a certified teacher. Jefferson ISD Superintendent Rob Barnwell said the new program has been in the works and the district is now happy to begin enrollment. Barnwell said the program will benefit the district and its students in several ways. “We are wanting to start this program for several reasons. Our enrollment has declined since the COVID-19 pandemic, and enrollment in most districts across the state has been similar to ours,” he said. “We would like to start getting kids enrolled in our district as early as possible, and although we already have a Head Start program, some kids/families do not meet the eligibility requirements to be enrolled into Head Start, so this program will be available for those families.” Head Start is a federal program that promotes the school readiness of children from birth to age five from low-income families. view article arw

Experts say children’s reading skills decline when they don’t read enough over the summer. So, Spring Branch ISD’s Summer Reading Challenge invites students to read what they like over the break and even win prizes. A 2020 report from NWEA, a not-for-profit organization that studies student growth and proficiency, showed over summer, third through fifth grade students dropped around 20 percent of the reading skills they had learned during the previous school year. view article arw

Copperas Cove ISD 2022 graduates consistently increased their end-of-course exams over their 2021 counterparts and met the scores or outperformed the scores of other seniors across the region and across Texas. The largest scoring gap between Copperas Cove High School seniors and other seniors in the region and the state was in U.S. history. More than half of the 2022 CCHS senior class mastered U.S. history with 55% of students demonstrating extreme knowledge of the subject as compared to 41% in the region and 43% in the state. In 2022, 81% of CCHS seniors exceeded the exam requirements as compared to only 70% in both the region and the state. Nearly all 2022 CCHS seniors passed the history exam with 95% passing as compared to 90% in the region and 89% in the state. view article arw

Students, parents, and teachers in the Southside ISD can celebrate after campuses made huge gains on the 2022 State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) exam, according to preliminary ratings. “I don’t know how the other districts performed, but we know we performed very well,” said Superintendent Rolando Ramirez. This year six Southside schools made 30-point gains or higher. “Normally, you’ll have a superintendent or a principal talking about all kinds of nice things about their students and staff. But these are the results showing it, and the results don’t lie,” Superintendent Ramirez said. He took over Southside ISD in 2020.  Administrators say it is only a matter of time before Southside has nationally recognized blue ribbon schools. view article arw

A charter school charged with educating high school dropouts is struggling to successfully carry out basic functions, creating extra challenges for students who already face tremendous obstacles. Texans Can Academies, which has campuses across the Dallas area and Texas, is now under strict state oversight because of its failure to ensure graduation requirements are met, to accurately record attendance and to maintain documentation that keeps students on track. The problems keep mounting. Just this semester, school leaders discovered that a grading error led to more than 140 students being told they would have to retake a class or pass an exam to retain credit. view article arw

After the COVID-19 pandemic’s education disruptions caused Texas students’ standardized test scores to drop, their performance is beginning to turn around toward pre-pandemic levels in three subject areas, according to test results released Thursday by the Texas Education Agency. But their scores across the board remain lower than they were before the pandemic. The agency released scores for high school students who took the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness this spring. High school students take these exams to graduate. They include subjects such as Algebra I, English I, English II, Biology and U.S History. Students improved in three tests that saw declines in 2021 due to the pandemic. In Algebra 1, 46% of students met grade level, a 5-percentage-point increase from spring 2021, but it’s still a 16-point decrease from spring 2019. view article arw

Students, parents, and teachers in the Southside ISD can celebrate after campuses made huge gains on the 2022 State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) exam, according to preliminary ratings. “I don’t know how the other districts performed, but we know we performed very well,” said Superintendent Rolando Ramirez. This year six Southside schools made 30-point gains or higher. “Normally, you’ll have a superintendent or a principal talking about all kinds of nice things about their students and staff. But these are the results showing it, and the results don’t lie,” Superintendent Ramirez said. He took over Southside ISD in 2020. view article arw

From school safety and mental health to funds for three new schools, Lake Travis ISD has several discussion items on its agenda for the June 15 board meeting. Bond election The bond advisory committee will give a presentation to the school board regarding a potential $703 million bond, according to school documents. Following work in the spring, the committee will recommend the district call a bond election in November for the following projects: new high school; new Elementary School No. 8; new Elementary School No. 9; Lake Travis High School additions and upgrades; campus and district renovations and improvements; facilities condition assessment projects; technology; and land. view article arw

Alejandro Barajas crossed the graduation stage at Dallas College in May. As his mom’s and grandma’s cheers pierced through the giant room, Barajas could hear how thrilled they were that he earned a degree. A few weeks later, they celebrated once again as he crossed the stage with fellow seniors from Sunset High School. Barajas is one of hundreds of Dallas ISD graduates who participated in dual ceremonies this spring, signaling their success in concurrently earning a diploma and an associate’s degree. “For me, that was the first generation to ever graduate and to get my associate’s,” Barajas said. “Before any of this, college was just an expensive way just to get a higher education. But now, I’m actually surprised at myself that I got this far.” view article arw

Richardson ISD showed positive signs of improvement during the 2021-22 school year, according to results of the district’s end of year review. The results were presented to the RISD board of trustees during a June 13 meeting. According to the Measure of Academic Progress, or MAP, tests, 53% of students met their growth projections in math, and 52% met them in reading. District officials said they are proud of the result, as the projections are designed to be met by 50% of students. view article arw

Highland Park ISD officials are working to select new English language arts materials for grades K-8 and are seeking feedback from district stakeholders. The search is part of the process of phasing out the Lucy Calkins’ Units of Study materials published by Heinemann, which have been in use since 2019. District officials hope to have the new materials in place by the start of the 2022-2023 school year. As of June, a subcommittee of the board of trustees, including trustees Bryce Benson, Maryjane Bonfield, Stacy Kelly, Assistant Superintendent for Education Services Lisa Wilson, and Superintendent Tom Trigg, narrowed the field of potential replacement english language arts materials for grades K-8 to eight options. view article arw

The Two Way Dual Language Academy program at Tomball ISD has 304 students spanning across 17 classrooms, Chief Academic Officer Michael Webb said during the presentation to the TISD board of trustees at the June 13 workshop meeting. The dual language program has 152 English-speaking students and 152 Spanish-speaking students who learn in English and Spanish at the same time, Webb said. Students receive math, social studies and reading language arts in English, while science and reading language arts is taught in Spanish, according to Multilingual Programs Director Brenda Arteaga. “[The students] are amazing. If you go in their classrooms, I can talk to them in Spanish; they can understand everything that I’m saying. They can have a conversation with me, they can read to me, their writing is great, and it’s both English and Spanish students,” Arteaga said. view article arw

EL PASO, Texas (CBS4) — El Paso's largest school district has struggled with academic achievement gaps between its wealthiest and poorest students. To help fix that, the El Paso Independent School District hired its first chief organizational transformation and equity officer. "It’s truly about people, in any organization it’s about people, in school districts it’s about students, it’s about our parents," said Marivel Macias, EPISD's chief organizational transformation and equity officer. view article arw

After the pandemic showed horrific learning loss among students, this year’s preliminary State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) results have Dallas ISD officials surprised and optimistic. Really optimistic. In last week’s school board briefing, Deputy Superintendent Susana Cordova revealed an early glimpse of this year’s STAAR and high school end-of-course exam results. They showed a surprising turnaround for a district that posted reading and math declines across all tested grades in elementary and middle school last year. In fact, in some grades and subjects this year, the district’s gains have surpassed pre-pandemic results from 2019. (The STAAR was canceled in 2019-2020 because of the pandemic.) view article arw

Alejandro Barajas crossed the graduation stage at Dallas College in May. As his mom’s and grandma’s cheers pierced through the giant room, Barajas could hear how thrilled they were that he earned a degree. A few weeks later, they celebrated once again as he crossed the stage with fellow seniors from Sunset High School. Barajas is one of hundreds of Dallas ISD graduates who participated in dual ceremonies this spring, signaling their success in concurrently earning a diploma and an associate’s degree. “For me, that was the first generation to ever graduate and to get my associate’s,” Barajas said. “Before any of this, college was just an expensive way just to get a higher education. But now, I’m actually surprised at myself that I got this far.” view article arw

After the pandemic showed horrific learning loss among students, this year’s preliminary State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) results have Dallas ISD officials surprised and optimistic. Really optimistic. In last week’s school board briefing, Deputy Superintendent Susana Cordova revealed an early glimpse of this year’s STAAR and high school end-of-course exam results. They showed a surprising turnaround for a district that posted reading and math declines across all tested grades in elementary and middle school last year. view article arw

Hutto ISD trustees received a presentation outlining recommendations from its gifted and talented, or GT, task force at a recent board meeting. The task force consisted of HISD teachers, administrators and parents who met five times beginning last November. In its meetings, the task force reviewed the district's GT program, helped develop surveys to gather input from GT parents and students, and identified short- and long-term goals to improve GT programming in the district. Director of Curriculum Meredith Roddy presented the task force's recommended goals to the HISD board of trustees at a June 9 meeting. view article arw

STEPHENVILLE — Tarleton State University and the Huckabay Independent School District have agreed to a partnership designed to lend a hand to HISD seniors who want a college education.  HISD and Tarleton leaders recently finalized an arrangement offering guaranteed admission and annual scholarships for the top 25 percent of the district’s high school graduates beginning with the Spring 2022 graduating class.  As part of the Distinguished High School Partnership, Tarleton also will waive ACT (American College Test) or SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) requirements for students in the top quarter of their class and application fees for students who qualify.  “Our reputation for student success is growing,” said Tarleton President James Hurley. “With that comes our ability to attract the brightest minds in our region. This collaboration aligns with our mission to provide a high-quality educational experience to students from right in our own backyard.” view article arw

SAN ANTONIO – She is a top scholar, entrepreneur and musician who uses her business as a way to help build culture. You may have even seen her art on display around the Alamo City. In today’s Great Graduate segment, we want to introduce you to Adriana Arellano, from Southside ISD. “I have a small jewelry business on Instagram called ‘HiSunnyLeo,’ where I make jewelry art that is like loosely related to the culture that takes place around like Jalisco in Mexico,” Arellano said. Adriana started her own business via Instagram – obviously it’s a way to make money, but for her, it’s much more than that. view article arw

Martinez is using her life experiences to motivate and help others SAN ANTONIO – Persistence, perseverance and passion describe today’s Great Graduate from Harlandale ISD, who is not letting anything slow her down. Celestina Martinez is using her life experiences to motivate and help others. “There were 17 bullet holes in my walls, and it was scary. It was really scary. We didn’t know what to do. It was like 3 a.m.,” Martinez said. Meet Celestina Martinez – whose family home was shot at multiple times. view article arw

Spring ISD’s newest campus, Momentum High School, will offer a blend of virtual and in-person learning to students in the upcoming school year, according to a June 6 news release from the district. About 150 students have opted to attend Momentum in the fall semester of the 2022-23 school year, according to the news release. The campus will offer different opportunities than a traditional campus, such as smaller class sizes and personalized learning plans. “Some students thrive on a large high school campus as one of thousands of students, but some students can feel really lost in that setting,” Momentum Principal Stacey Smith said via the June 6 news release. “Here at Momentum, whether a student is celebrating a success—like completing a course credit—or going through a tough time, somebody’s going to notice." Momentum will be a school of choice at SISD, according to the news release—students must apply and be accepted before attending. view article arw

Under Senate Bill 15, passed by the state Legislature in September, local public school districts have the opportunity to establish a remote learning campus for students. Conroe ISD is taking that opportunity and launching a new online academy starting in August. At its regular monthly meeting in April, the CISD board of trustees approved the district application to the Texas Education Agenda for a County District Campus Number for a full-time virtual or a hybrid campus for next school year. The district publicly announced its new virtual academy on Monday and have already started receiving applications through its new webpage. view article arw

STEPHENVILLE, Texas —Tarleton State University will provide annual scholarships and guarantee admission to Argyle High School seniors who graduate in the top 25 percent of their class beginning with the Spring 2022 graduating class.  The Argyle Independent School District and Tarleton leaders finalized the agreement with a memorandum signed late last week.  As part of the Distinguished High School Partnership, Tarleton will waive ACT (American College Test) or SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) requirements for students in the top 25 percent of their class and application fees for students who qualify. The university will offer scholarships of at least $1,000 each year to Argyle’s top graduates.  “This collaboration aligns with our mission to provide a high-quality experience to students in our area,” said Tarleton President James Hurley. “Our reputation for student focus and big-effect undergraduate research is growing. With that comes our ability to attract high school seniors who will become game changers.” view article arw

Spring Branch ISD students made significant strides in the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness and End of Course exams in grade levels across the district, according to preliminary results in a district report. The 2021-22 is the second year in a row that the district has improved its overall scores, the preliminary results show. view article arw

Richardson ISD announced plans to build day care centers within the district during its June 6 meeting. According to district officials, RISD expects to build four day care centers, one in each learning community that is served by the district's four high schools. The day care centers will be available for RISD staff only. The first phase of the project will include building two locations, one at Canyon Creek Elementary and one in the former Newcomer Center across from Richardson High School. Improvements for the Newcomer Center were initially discussed as part of the 2021 bond election.    (08) view article arw

BRYAN, Texas — Students from Rudder High and Bryan ISD Transportation and Maintenance came together in June to build Words on Wheels, a new summer reading initiative for kids throughout the community. Words on Wheels is in its second year serving as a mobile library across the Brazos Valley. “We’re trying to bring books to the community and continue reading all summer long,” said Denise Kersten, Library Program Coordinator, Bryan ISD. “It’s been so much fun to meet all the families, to meet so many kids across the district and across the community.” view article arw

Conroe ISD is proud to announce the Conroe ISD Virtual School for the 2022-2023 school year. This virtual campus will be open to CISD students in grades five through eight that meet the enrollment guidelines of SB 15 and Conroe ISD. view article arw