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Several Republican State Board of Education candidates who ran in opposition of so-called critical race theory in public schools won their races Tuesday night, giving Republicans one more seat on the board, according to Decision Desk HQ. Most notably, Republicans successfully flipped District 2, which covers part of the Gulf Coast. All 15 seats on the State Board of Education were open this election season because of redistricting that took place last year. The board is responsible for dictating what Texas’ 5.5 million students are required to learn in the state’s public schools. There will be 10 Republicans and 5 Democrats on the board starting in January. view article arw

While many Texans were focused on top-of-the-ballot races ahead of Election Day, every voter in the state also had a say in who controls statewide education policy. The GOP made gains — with the help of record-shattering campaign contributions and by targeting so-called "critical race theory." All 15 positions were up for grabs this year on the State Board of Education, which approves textbooks, sets curriculum standards and has veto power over new charter schools. The GOP picked up one seat. Republican LJ Francis flipped District 2 — which stretches up from the Rio Grande Valley along the Gulf of Mexico in southeast Texas — giving the GOP a 10-5 majority on the board, up from 9-6.    (14) view article arw

Several Republican State Board of Education candidates who ran in opposition of so-called critical race theory in public schools won their races Tuesday night, giving Republicans one more seat on the board, according to Decision Desk HQ.  Most notably, Republicans successfully flipped District 2, which covers part of the Gulf Coast.  All 15 seats on the State Board of Education were open this election season because of redistricting that took place last year. The board is responsible for dictating what Texas’ 5.5 million students are required to learn in the state’s public schools. There will be 10 Republicans and 5 Democrats on the board starting in January.    (10) view article arw

Texas Monthly; Getty Of all the political races to be decided on November 8, the ones for seats on the State Board of Education may be among the least sexy—and the most consequential. With several incumbents already unseated in primaries, and several more facing tough opponents in the general election, the new year could usher in a more right-wing band of politicians who will decide how children learn history in Texas—and across the United States. “The people behind the scenes in public education are fascinating,” said journalist Grace Lynch, who hosts the new podcast Teaching Texas. “It was pretty miraculous to me that everywhere I turned there was another person whose absurdity was only matched by their influence.” view article arw

In many ways, the Covid-19 pandemic made schools political hotbeds of controversy nationwide. From mask mandates to campus closures, parents and politicians have weighed in from both sides of the political divide. Even race and gender content in curricula and libraries have become part of the highly charged discourse. So with all 15 seats of the State Board of Education (SBOE) on the ballot in November, and early voting already underway, these races are drawing scrutiny from state political observers. While these are often overlooked contests, they are drawing interest from those who want to see if the board continues its march to the right. Of the 33 candidates running for the 15 seats, 14 are Republicans, 11 are Democrats, two are independents, and three are Libertarians. Nine of the current board members are running for re-election, six Republicans and three Democrats.    (03) view article arw

Opponents of so-called "critical race theory" are taking their battle against diversity, equity and inclusion from school board meetings to the campaign trail — in the form of large-dollar donations to a new political action committee (PAC). The group claims school children are being subjected to "radical indoctrination, anti-American curriculum, and sexually explicit materials." Since the beginning of 2021, it's supported winning candidates in some of the largest school districts in Texas. The PAC expanded its scope this year to the State Board of Education races, where candidates from both parties have shattered political contribution records. "It’s unprecedented in the State Board of Education races," said Jennifer Mitchell, governmental relations director at the non-partisan Association of Texas Professional Educators. "It was definitely new to see that level of investment, and it seemed very clearly aimed at opportunities to pick up more support on the board."    (01) view article arw

Marisa Perez-Diaz, the Democrat currently serving as District 3's representative on the State Board of Education, faces a challenge from Ken Morrow, a Republican insurance salesman. District 3 stretches from the U.S.-Mexico border to Gonzales County, and includes DeWitt, Lavaca and Goliad counties in the Crossroads. However, the race could have ramifications across the state, as the state board wields significant influence over Texas' education standards and textbooks. view article arw

The Eanes Independent School District is rescheduling a lesson surrounding banned books to October amid some concerns from community members about the lesson. Eanes ISD officials confirmed their planned Hill Country Middle School presentation, originally scheduled to coincide with “Banned Book Week,” will likely take place in October. Officials said in an email to KXAN they “fundamentally support conversations and lessons about intellectual freedom and access to reading materials.” view article arw

The Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) was going to revise the social studies curriculum across the state, giving teachers a clear picture of how U.S. history and social studies will be taught in K–12 public schools. This happens every ten years. Yet there was a lot of pushbacks on certain proposals and, to sort through the complexity of the issues, the State Board of Education decided to postpone revisions until the year 2025. 320-x-50-Auto-Loan-Fall-2022 Last year, Texas passed a bill that banned the teaching of Critical Race Theory from public K-12 schools. The bill prohibited any teaching that, “one race or sex is inherently superior to another race or sex; (an individual, by virtue of the individual ’s race or sex, is inherently racist, sexist, or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously; an individual should be discriminated against or receive adverse treatment solely or partly because of the individual ’s race or sex; an individual ’s moral character, standing, or worth is necessarily determined by the individual ’s race or sex.” view article arw

Texas may change how your child understands biology when taught in a public high school classroom. The Texas' Board of Education tentatively approved changes to portions of the states Biology curriculum. Instead of asking Texas public school students to “evaluate” scientific explanations for the origins of DNA and the complexity of certain cells, the state will now ask that the students "examine" the scientific explanations for the origins of DNA and complexity of certain cells. In the past, some educators have argued that the word "evaluate" encouraged students to challenge the scientific theory of evolution and opened the door to teaching creationism. view article arw

The Georgetown Board of Trustees has hired Fred Brent as the district's newest superintendent. view article arw