The power of advocacy

March 3007:45 AM
 

If we ever wondered about the power of advocacy, legislation introduced by the chairmen of both the Senate and the House should reinforce the need to continue to push for sound legislative policy relating to public education. Last week, Senate Education Committee chairman Larry Taylor and House Public Education Committee chairman Dan Huberty introduced bills targeting the A-F grading system scheduled to be put in place in the 2018-2019 school year. And while it is obviously too early to know what impact either will have, the fact that this topic is on the table speaks volumes for advocacy efforts. view article arw

AUSTIN - The Texas Senate today, by unanimous vote, confirmed Gov. Greg Abbott’s appointment of Donna Bahorich as chair of the State Board of Education.   “I’m honored that Gov. Abbott and the Texas Senate have affirmed their confidence in me to continue to chair the State Board of Education. Along with my fellow board members, I look forward to continuing our efforts to strengthen curriculum standards, approve high quality textbooks, increase transparency in both curriculum standards development and textbooks adoption, and provide oversight to the $37 billion Permanent School Fund,” Bahorich said view article arw

You might say that Donna Bahorich took an old-school approach to proving herself worthy of chairing the State Board of Education, even among some of her critics: She earned it.  That is why her confirmation by the Senate Nominations Committee on Thursday should not be in question. And why the full Senate should support Bahorich’ s reappointment as chair of the 15-member State Board of Education. view article arw

State Board of Education Update

February 1308:42 AM
 

Great Summary - Hope this is first of many more in the future. - js - Larry Taylor, chair of the Senate Education Committee, administered the oath of office to eight board members during their first meeting of the year. Elected to four-year terms of office in November are, left to right, Marty Rowley of Amarillo, Donna Bahorich of Houston, Sue Melton-Malone of Robinson, Georgina C. Pérez of El Paso, Barbara Cargill of The Woodlands, Tom Maynard of Florence, Ken Mercer of San Antonio, and Keven Ellis of Lufkin. view article arw

Last week, the Texas Board of Education approved a draft of revisions made to its science education standards. While board members approved nearly all of the changes suggested by a committee of educators, they also voted to partially replace cuts made to controversial language regarding the teaching of evolution.  “What they did . . . was accept two of our recommendations [to change evolution teaching standards], but added some language that reintroduced the creationist open-door policy,” Ron Wetherington, a committee member and professor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, told view article arw

East Texas area school districts this month are taking time to recognize the accomplishments of their Career and Technology Education programs as part of February's national CTE month. view article arw

The Texas Board of Education has preliminarily voted to ease - but not completely eliminate - state high school science curriculum requirements that experts argued cast doubt on the theory of evolution. The Republican-controlled board on Wednesday modified language that had asked biology students to consider "all sides" of scientific theory. Teachers and academics said that let religious ideology trump science on evolution, and might have left students believing God created life. view article arw

SBOE Meeting Jan. 31-Feb. 3

February 0306:52 AM
 

The State Board of Education will meet Jan. 31 - Feb. 3. The full agenda is posted online and the meeting is livestreamed. read more arw

AUSTIN (KXAN) — The Texas Board of Education plans to ease up on the curriculum requirements for high school science classes; a change that some say discredits the theory of evolution.  In a preliminary vote on Wednesday, the board sided with a panel of teachers, not the scientists who warned against the changes. Opponents believe the vote will open the door to creationism in public schools.  The State Board of Education wants to simplify science requirements to streamline how public schools teach evolution to high school students. A committee of teachers and scholars says the state’s current standard to teach and scrutinize all sides of science theory is too time consuming and confusing for students to learn. view article arw

AUSTIN -- The State Board of Education on Wednesday rejected several attempts to delete wording in the high school biology curriculum that welcomes the teaching of creationism.  Board members voted largely along party lines to reject recommendations from a task force to remove provisions or standards that call for students to "evaluate scientific explanations" for the complexity of cell biology, the origin of life and the appearance of fossils.   The board voted in 2009 to require public school science instructors to teach "all sides" of scientific theory. The hotly contested change drew the ire of many teachers and education activist groups who argued the standard was an excuse to permit the teaching of creationism.   view article arw

The Texas Board of Education will decide whether to scrap a requirement that public schools teach high school students to scrutinize "all sides" of scientific theory after hearing Tuesday from academics who say that was meant to water down lessons on evolution and leave students wondering whether God created the universe.  Supporters of the existing high school science curriculums told the board that changing the rule could hurt independent thought in classrooms across America's second-largest state. view article arw

A committee has recommended dropping four curriculum standards that challenge evolution. The State Board of Education will debate the issue Wednesday and take a vote Friday.  Supporters of the requirements say they promote critical thinking in students.  The State Board of Education will vote Friday on whether to drop requirements that high school students must learn theories that challenge the scientific understanding of evolution. view article arw

A committee has recommended dropping four curriculum standards that challenge evolution. The State Board of Education will debate the issue Wednesday and take a vote Friday.  Supporters of the requirements say they promote critical thinking in students.  The State Board of Education will vote Friday on whether to drop requirements that high school students must learn theories that challenge the scientific understanding of evolution. view article arw

The Georgetown Board of Trustees has hired Fred Brent as the district's newest superintendent. view article arw