The files below provide summaries that highlight actions taken by the State Board of Education (SBOE).  For information regarding summaries of SBOE or Commissioner actions, please contact the Rulemaking Unit at 475-1497. For information regarding specific action items listed, please contact the appropriate Texas Education Agency staff as indicated in the summary pages. read more arw

Texas may change how your child understands biology when taught in a public high school classroom. The Texas' Board of Education tentatively approved changes to portions of the states Biology curriculum. Instead of asking Texas public school students to “evaluate” scientific explanations for the origins of DNA and the complexity of certain cells, the state will now ask that the students "examine" the scientific explanations for the origins of DNA and complexity of certain cells. In the past, some educators have argued that the word "evaluate" encouraged students to challenge the scientific theory of evolution and opened the door to teaching creationism. view article arw

State Board of Education Evolves

April 2708:30 AM
 

Here's a sentence seldom seen over the past few decades: Science advocates are praising the Texas State Board of Education. Such insanity is the result of the SBOE's recent vote to scrap wording in high school biology standards that instructed students to challenge evolution. The issue dates back to 2009, when the 15-member body – then led by a young-Earth creationist and influenced by intelligent design advocates at the Discovery Institute – opened the door for anti-evolution arguments in science textbooks by adding a new curriculum requirement that students must examine "all sides of scientific evidence."  view article arw

Dr. Randy Hoyer, Superintendent of Skidmore-Tynan ISD has been named Superintendent of Schools for OGISD. Dr. Hoyer was named Lone Finalist for the position and was officially hired by the District on April 17th at the OGISD Regular Board meeting. He replaces Mr. Lynn Burton who is retiring effective June 30, 2017. view article arw

Austin – The State Board of Education today gave final approval to streamlined science standards for kindergarten through high school. Streamlining eliminates, clarifies or combines some standards without adding additional content. The board also gave preliminary approval to updated standards, known as Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS), for English and Spanish language arts and reading for high school. Final approval is expected to occur in June.  However, after amending English and Spanish language arts and reading standards for elementary and middle school, the board postponed the final vote on those standards until 8 a.m. May 10 to provide time for the board and Texas Agency staff to ensure that the amendments have been accurately incorporated before adoption. The two-and-a-half week delay will not affect Proclamation 2019 approved by the board. In addition, the delay will not extend the public comment period.

In what could be the first step in integrating ethnic studies into Texas high school curriculum, the State Board of Education is considering a new English class that examines works of authors from different ethnic backgrounds.Board member Georgina C. Pérez, D-El Paso, has proposed a comparative literature class for juniors or seniors that would include works by authors from diverse backgrounds.  The optional course would fulfill students’ English 3 or 4 requirement and would follow established curriculum, so the board wouldn’t have to take on the complicated and lengthy process of creating new curriculum standards. view article arw

The Texas State Board of Education tentatively voted to remove language in high school biology standards that would have required students to challenge evolutionary science. Currently, the curriculum requires students to “evaluate” scientific explanations for the origins of DNA and the complexity of certain cells, which some have argued could open the door to teaching creationism. Wednesday’s vote, preceded by a lengthy and contentious debate, would change how science teachers approach such topics in the classroom. The word “evaluate” could require an additional two weeks of lesson time for teachers who are already on tight schedules to cover material for the state’s standardized tests, said Ron Wetherington, a Southern Methodist University professor on the 10-member committee of teachers and scientists that the board appointed in July to help streamline science standards. view article arw

Ray High School principal Cecilia Reynolds-Perez was among 10 appointees to the Texas School Safety Center Board by Gov. Greg Abbott. The Texas School Safety Center is an official university-level research center at Texas State University. The center is advised by a board of directors. The board reports to the Governor, the legislature, the State Board of Education and the Texas Education Agency regarding school safety and security, and advises the center on its function, budget and strategic planning initiatives. view article arw

The Texas State Board of Education tentatively voted to remove language in high school biology standards that would have required students to challenge evolutionary science. Currently, the curriculum requires students to “evaluate” scientific explanations for the origins of DNA and the complexity of certain cells, which some have argued could open the door to teaching creationism. Wednesday's vote, which had been preceded by a lengthy and contentious debate in recent months, would change how science teachers approach such topics in the classroom. The word "evaluate" could require another two weeks of lesson time for teachers who are already on tight schedules to cover material for the state's standardized tests, said Ron Wetherington, a Southern Methodist University professor on the 10-member committee of teachers and scientists that the board appointed in July to help streamline science standards.  view article arw

The State Board of Education has compromised on how Texas high school students will learn about the theory of evolution in school. “I think this is a product … of the board recognizing the input … and working with the committee to come up with an acceptable language … that both meets the expectations of the committee and also balances with it the input I’ve received from constituents, educators, community members and a lot of other folks,” said board vice chairman Marty Rowley, R-Amarillo.  On Wednesday, the panel gave preliminary approval of new high school biology curriculum that is slightly pared down from the current standards. The move follows a months-long process examining how evolution should be taught in classrooms. view article arw

Imagine your child in class surrounded by peers eagerly recommending books to each other. Across the room, the teacher is working with a small group of student authors completing final edits on the poems they will share with the class tomorrow, and at the media station, another group huddles over its tablets creating a presentation to critique a new local policy.  Last year, a group of Texas educators dared to dream of joyful language arts classrooms with robust learning experiences beyond the STAAR tests, and then we got to work and made it real. Proudly, we presented the standards to the State Board of Education. Then the board took that dream away. view article arw

Texas education board members have reached some consensus on language that relates to challenging scientific theories about evolution.  The Texas State Board of Education found common ground Tuesday between key players on both sides of a contentious debate about what language to include in high school biology standards. Currently, the curriculum requires students to “evaluate” scientific explanations for the origins of DNA and the complexity of certain cells, which some say could open the door to teaching creationism.  view article arw

This week's State Board of Education debate about high school biology standards and governing how to teach students about the theory of evolution could come down to a single word: evaluate.  At a February meeting, board members took a preliminary vote to modify those curriculum standards, keeping in language that would require students to challenge evolutionary science. view article arw

I am greatly concerned with false information regarding the Texas State Board of Education and the choice provided by public charter schools to inner city families.  With the 2017 legislative session, powerful “anti-charter” lobby groups are attacking the SBOE for both the “inner-city school choice” provided by charter schools, and the administration of the Permanent School Fund (PSF) Bond Guarantee Program including the refinancing of bonds for highly qualified charters. view article arw

The power of advocacy

March 3007:45 AM
 

If we ever wondered about the power of advocacy, legislation introduced by the chairmen of both the Senate and the House should reinforce the need to continue to push for sound legislative policy relating to public education. Last week, Senate Education Committee chairman Larry Taylor and House Public Education Committee chairman Dan Huberty introduced bills targeting the A-F grading system scheduled to be put in place in the 2018-2019 school year. And while it is obviously too early to know what impact either will have, the fact that this topic is on the table speaks volumes for advocacy efforts. view article arw

AUSTIN - The Texas Senate today, by unanimous vote, confirmed Gov. Greg Abbott’s appointment of Donna Bahorich as chair of the State Board of Education.   “I’m honored that Gov. Abbott and the Texas Senate have affirmed their confidence in me to continue to chair the State Board of Education. Along with my fellow board members, I look forward to continuing our efforts to strengthen curriculum standards, approve high quality textbooks, increase transparency in both curriculum standards development and textbooks adoption, and provide oversight to the $37 billion Permanent School Fund,” Bahorich said view article arw

You might say that Donna Bahorich took an old-school approach to proving herself worthy of chairing the State Board of Education, even among some of her critics: She earned it.  That is why her confirmation by the Senate Nominations Committee on Thursday should not be in question. And why the full Senate should support Bahorich’ s reappointment as chair of the 15-member State Board of Education. view article arw

The Georgetown Board of Trustees has hired Fred Brent as the district's newest superintendent. view article arw